BFO
Budapest Festival Orchestra

Bridging Europe - Contemporary Concert

Bridging Europe

M├╝pa, Festival Theatre September 29, 2017, 19:45

conductor: Pascal Rophé

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About the concert

Ramon Lazkano: Eriden 
Alberto Posadas: Oscuro abismo de llanto y de ternura 
Hèctor Parra: Caressant l’horizon 

It was three works in particular that had such an impact on Pascal Rophé as to launch the Frenchman into conducting, namely: Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, The Rite of Spring by Stravinsky, and The Hammer Without a Master by Boulez. He is equally at home with contemporary music as he is with symphonies from the 18th or 19th centuries. This time he’s chosen contemporary Spanish works to showcase his passion and innovative personality.Multiple award-winning Basque composer Ramon Lazkano hails from the beautiful seaside town of San Sebastián, a city which regularly receives the BFO as a guest. The composition chosen to feature in this concert, Eriden (1997-98), comprises two wholly conflicting parts. The first is dense and fluid, with frequent – and sometimes extreme – tempo changes, while the second movement is constant and calm, with numerous pauses. The work’s title also alludes to this duality; its translation from Basque could mean both ‘to find’ and something that ‘has been found’.

The composition Oscuro abismo de llanto y de ternura (2003), by Alberto Posadas, also offers a dense, rich musical texture; its title means the ‘dark abyss of weeping and tenderness’. Sounds clash against each other with the ferocity of colliding tectonic plates. The work, like many of Posadas’ creations, is an exciting fusion of the mathematical and physical processes which the composer likes to incorporate into his compositions.

Hèctor Parra is another composer with a major interest in the dynamics of natural forces, which explains why his Caressant l’horizon (2011) employs a scientific approach to music. His depiction, however, is neither romantic nor stereotypical. It pushes the boundaries of time, space, and human fragility; through metaphors of biology and physics he imagines what would happen if we were exposed to extreme gravitational waves.