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About the program

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony no.40, K.550

Mozart completed his fortieth symphony – perhaps most popular – on 25 July 1788. The key of G minor is for Mozart almost always a medium for tragic expression. This is true even though the sound” was not developed by him, but – as the Mozart scholar, Stanley Sadie has shown – was widely used by the representatives of the “Sturm und Drang” movement (Johann Christian Bach, Haydn, Vanhal). The Symphony in G minor was raised to the status of an almost mystical legend by succeeding generations of romanticism. This is perhaps due – beside the truly incomparable beauty and perfection of the work – to the fact that Mozart has long been viewed and interpreted in terms of the tragedy of his life and early death. Yet the G minor Symphony is not just tragedy: Schumann, for example, spoke of the work’s “Hellenistic, floating grace”.

Anton Bruckner: Symphony no.9

The second piece on the evening’s programme is the Symphony in D minor is the last of Bruckner’s symphonies. Bruckner started to compose it in the summer of 1887, after finishing the first version of Symphony No. 8. Working at a slow pace the composer was delayed even further by trying to revise three earlier symphonies at the same time, and he also had to finish two compositions he was commissioned to compose. He worked on the last movement of Symphony No. 9 until October 1896, when he died, but he did not have enough time to complete the partiture. According to his doctor, not long before his death Bruckner said: he previously dedicated his two symphonies to earthly rulers (Ludwig, King of Bavaria and Emperor Franz Joseph), but this one he dedicates to the ruler of rulers, to God, asking him to give him enough time to finish it…


Program

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony no.40, K.550
Anton Bruckner: Symphony no.9

conductor

Iván Fischer